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This is where Colorado's 11 ballot measures stand in the 2022 midterm election

Election 2022 Colorado Early Voting
Posted at 11:43 AM, Nov 09, 2022

Eleven ballot measures were proposed to voters across Colorado and included a range of changes for residents, and local businesses and schools.

As of noon, voters appeared to have rejected or approved seven of the 11 measures.

More election coverage: Live blog | Election results

The Colorado Secretary of State’s office reported as of 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, 2,444,585 ballots had been returned.

Denver7 will update this story once more results come in.

    Wednesday a.m. update: Colorado ballot measures results, plus those too close to call


    Proposition 121 - Approved
    Around 10:30 p.m. on Tuesday, the Associated Press projected that the proposition, which would change the Colorado Revised Statutes to reduce the state income tax from 4.55% to 4.4% for business and corporations passed.

    It will also reduce the amount of money going into Colorado’s General Fund by several hundred millions of dollars each year.

    Results:

    • Yes: 65.53%, 1,194,817 votes
    • No: 34.47%, 628,610 votes

    Proposition 122 - Approved
    In a statement Wednesday evening, Karen Crummy with Natural Medicine Colorado said, “Colorado voters approved Proposition 122, the Natural Medicine Health Act, which will create a framework for regulated, therapeutic use of natural psychedelic medicines for adults over 21 while continuing to prohibit their retail sales.”

    In a statement Wednesday evening, Karen Crummy with Natural Medicine Colorado said, “Colorado voters approved Proposition 122, the Natural Medicine Health Act, which will create a framework for regulated, therapeutic use of natural psychedelic medicines for adults over 21 while continuing to prohibit their retail sales.”

    As of 8:16 p.m. Wednesday, 51.40% of voters approved of the measure, while 48.60% of Colorado voters rejected Proposition 122.

    In a tweet, Luke Niforatos, an opponent of Prop 122, conceded that the measure will pass.

    Proposition 124 - Rejected
    Proposition 124 would have allowed retail liquor stores to apply for the ability to be able to open additional locations over time, with no limit on the number after 2036.

    Results:

    • Yes: 37.58%, 680,241 votes
    • No: 62.42%, 1,130,008 votes

    Proposition 126 - Rejected
    Proposition 126 would have allowed third-party companies to deliver alcohol, and made takeout and alcohol deliveries from bars and restaurants permanent. The latter was introduced during COVID-19.

    Results:

    • Yes: 47.60%, 959,446 votes
    • No: 52.40%, 1,056,019 votes

    Amendment D - Approved
    Colorado voters are projected to approve this amendment, which directs the governor to reassign judges from the 18th Judicial District to the new 23rd Judicial District by Nov. 30, 2024. Currently, the 17th Judicial District is the largest in the state.

    Once the 23rd Judicial District is in place in 2025, it will consist of Douglas, Elbert, and Lincoln counties, while the 18th Judicial District will include Arapahoe County.

    Results:

    • Yes: 67.51%, 1,145,233 votes
    • No: 32.49%, 551,081 votes

    Amendment E - Approved
    Voters overwhelmingly chose to pass this amendment to expand the homestead exemption to homeowners who lost their spouse in the line of military duty, or to people whose veteran spouse died as a result of service-related injuries or disease.

    Fifty percent of the first $200,000 of a home’s value would be tax-exempt.

    Results:

    • Yes: 87.95%, 1,593,069 votes
    • No: 12.05%, 218,219 votes

    Amendment F - Rejected
    This amendment proposed dropping the minimum requirements for how long a nonprofit must exist in order to hold a bingo-raffle license from five to three years.

    This would have allowed, but not required, nonprofits to compensate their volunteers running the games financially or through in-kind benefits, like paying for gas or meals. Wages would have been capped at minimum wage through June 2024, but the cap would lift afterward.

    Results:

    • Yes: 39.06%, 677,276 votes
    • No: 60.94%, 1,056,863 votes

    Proposition FF - Approved
    This proposition asked voters if they want to create a statewide program that would offer free meals to all public students in Colorado starting in the next school year. It would be paid through federal reimbursements and a cap on charitable tax deductions for people making $300,000 or more a year.

    Results:

    • Yes: 55.11%, 1,011,114 votes
    • No: 44.89%, 823,714 votes

    Proposition GG - Approved
    Late Tuesday evening, Coloradans passed this proposition, which will require Colorado petitions and ballots for citizen-initiated measures that change the individual income tax rate to feature a table showing the effects of the tax change based on people’s different wage brackets.

    Results:

    • Yes: 70.84%, 1,263,902 votes
    • No: 29.16%, 520,145 votes

    The below ballot measures have not yet been called. These reflect current numbers as of Wednesday 8:16 p.m.

    Proposition 123:
    This proposition, if voters choose to pass it, would dedicate up to 0.1% of the state’s income taxes each year for affordable housing projects across the state. This would not raise income taxes, but would rededicate a portion of them to new projects.

    If passed, the measure is expected to raise $145 million in budget year 2022-23 and $290 million in budget year 2023-24. These funds would go to local governments and nonprofits acquiring and preserving land for affordable housing development, giving assistance for developing affordable housing and multi-family rentals, increasing payment assistance programs for first-time homebuyers, going toward a program to address homelessness through rental assistance, and boosting the capacity of local planning departments.

    Current results (87% reporting):

    • Yes: 50.72%, 1,006,570 votes
    • No: 49.28%, 977,857 votes
    Affordable housing proposition race still too close to call

    Proposition 125:
    If passed, this proposition would allow licensed grocery and convenience stores that already sell beer to also sell wine. It would also allow them to hold alcohol tastings starting in March 2023.

    Current results (87% reporting):

    • Yes: 49.88%, 996,332 votes
    • No: 50.12%, 1,001,058 votes
    Voters split on Propositions 122, 125