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Growing together: Support group for moms hosts plant potting class in children's memory

A Mother's Love supports members all year, but especially during the holidays
Growing together: Support group for moms pots plants in children's memory
Posted at 11:22 PM, Dec 10, 2022

DENVER — "A Mother's Love" is a support group for mothers who have lost their children, giving them a space where their feelings are understood on a deeply personal level by their fellow members.

It was started by Angel Shabazz after her 17-year-old son Davarie Armstrong was shot and killed in 2020.

“He was a scholar, a big brother, and number one athlete," Shabazz said about her son.

READ MORE: A Mother's Love: A support group for moms who have lost children

Shabazz said the holidays can be especially difficult for mothers in the same situation. Normally, it is a time when mothers shower their children with love.

“The holidays are super hard for us, around this time, no matter how old your child was," said Shabazz.

Growing together: Support group for moms pot plants in children's memory

On Saturday afternoon, Shabazz arranged for the support group to meet at Unique Arrangements in Denver for a class where they learned how to pot plants. The group also decorated the pots they would later take home.

“If you want to dedicate that plant to your child, you can," said Shabazz.

RELATED: A story behind the statistics: Family reflects on teenage football player, shot and killed over a year ago

The Owner of Unique Arrangements, Kenya Johnson, said she has several plants named after her son who was killed by gun violence.

“Plants are really healing for me, and I like to share that," Johnson said to the class. “A lot of people would be like, I ain't a plant person. Yes, you are. There's a plant for anybody. It just needs some attention and some care. And on those days that you're feeling down, that plant will lift you up. I promise you.”

Shabazz started a fundraiser in her son's name, called the DJ Armstrong foundation. The goal is to raise $17,000 for a high school student, who could either apply and use the money toward college or a technical trade. The point of the money is to better their life.